Middle School College Support

Excel’s Middle School College Access Program is designed to support students in 5th-8th grade to develop college-going identities and skills essential for success in college and career. The goals of this program are that students are experiencing colleges and universities, talking to their families about their future and goals, and seeing college as a possibility for their future.

Click on the grade level below to learn more about what students do in each grade!

  • 5th Grade

    College Experience:

    Every Fall students visit Northeastern, eat lunch on campus and attend a Husky’s basketball game.

    Outcomes:

    Every year students report that due to the trip they are more likely to go to college and speak with their families about their future.

    Ways to support your student:

    • Talk to your student about their experience on the Northeastern trip: What did they see? What did they enjoy? What questions do they have?
    • Talk with your student about what they see for their future and what you envision for them. Are those the same goals or different and why?
    • Also, ask them about their favorite subjects in school.
    • If you or anyone in your family is enrolled in college encourage your student to speak with them about their experience: what classes are they taking, what are their favorite parts, how does it relate to their future goals, what is challenging?

    Summer Opportunities and Extracurriculars:

    There are many summer programs available for 5th-grade students – please click here to learn more.

  • 6th Grade

    College Experience:

    Each spring students tour a college, eat lunch, and experience what it is like to be a college student by taking their Math and English classes in a college classroom.

    Outcomes:

    Every year students report that due to the trip they are more likely to go to college and speak with their families about their future and they report that taking their classes in a college auditorium makes them feel like a college student.

    Ways to support your student:

    • Talk to your student about their experience on the college trip: What was it like to take a class in a college auditorium? How is this college different than the college they visited last year? What did they see? What did they enjoy? What questions do they have?

    • Talk with your student about what they see for their future and what you envision for them. Are those the same goals or different and why?

    • Also, ask them about their favorite subjects in school.

    • If you or anyone in your family is enrolled in college encourage your student to speak with them about their experience: what classes are they taking, what are their favorite parts, how does it relate to their future goals, what is challenging?

    Summer Opportunities and Extracurriculars:

  • 7th Grade

    College Experience:

    In the winter students hear from a panel of Excel alumni currently enrolled in college or other pathways about their experiences. Students have the chance to ask questions of students who sat in their seats just a few years before.

    Outcomes:

    Every year students report that due to the panel they are more likely to go to college and speak with their families about their future. They report that hearing from students who are similar to them makes them believe they can achieve their college and career goals.

    Ways to support your student:

    • Talk to your student about their experience on the panel: What did the alumni talk about? What parts of their experience did you connect with most? What was surprising to you?

    • Talk with your student about what they see for their future and what you envision for them. Are those the same goals or different and why?

    • Also, ask them about their favorite subjects in school.

    • If you or anyone in your family is enrolled in college encourage your student to speak with them about their experience: what classes are they taking, what are their favorite parts, how does it relate to their future goals, what is challenging?

    Scholarships and Extracurricular Opportunities:

     

    • SEED: Teachers nominate up to 5 students to apply for this school year science and math program at MIT. Click here to learn more.

    • Jack Kent Cooke: Teachers nominate up to 2 students to apply for this extremely competitive scholarship that supports students starting in high school and provides college scholarship money. Click here to learn more.

    • Red Sox Scholars: Teachers nominate up to 5 students to apply for a$10,000 college scholarship and support throughout high school. Click here to learn more.

    • El Mundo Latino Heritage Recognition Day: Teachers nominate up to 2 students to be El Mundo Scholars – they earn tickets to a Red Sox game where they are recognized as leaders in their community. Click here to learn more.

    • There are many summer programs available for7th-grade students- please click here to learn more.

     

  • 8th Grade

    College Experience:

    In the spring, 8th graders spend the night at Regis College to help them experience what it is like to live on a college campus.

    High School Transition Course:

    students engage in a once a week elective class to help students articulate what is important to them for their future, building the skills they will need for high school such as organization and time management, and providing concrete information about the role of GPA and other factors for college admissions and the financial aid process

    Outcomes:

    Every year students report that due to the trip they are more likely to go to college and speak with their families about their future. They report feeling like they would consider living at college.

    Ways to support your student:

    • Talk to your student about their experience on the trip: What was their favorite part? What was it like to sleep in the dorms and eat in the cafeteria? How did it feel to spend the night away from home?
    • Talk with your student about what they see for their future and what you envision for them. Are those the same goals or different and why?
    • Also, ask them about their favorite subjects in school.
    • If you or anyone in your family is enrolled in college encourage your student to speak with them about their experience: what classes are they taking, what are their favorite parts, how does it relate to their future goals, what is challenging?

    Scholarships and Extracurricular Opportunities: